Is Cranberry Juice of Help to Peptic Ulcer Sufferers

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Peptic ulcers are increasingly being attributed to infection by Helicobacter pylori bacteria, as opposed to stress and/or stomach acidity. A high-molecular-weight nondialysable constituent of cranberry juice has been shown to inhibit the adhesion of H. pylori to human gastric mucus in vitro.( n1) These preliminary results suggest that cranberry may be beneficial in the prevention of peptic ulcers through the inhibition of H. pylori adhesion to gastric mucus and stomach epithelium.

H. priori is capable of surviving in the mucosal lining of the stomach and duodenum by neutralizing stomach acid, in its local environment, through urea hydrolysis. In Western countries approximately 50 percent of persons above the age of 60 are affected. Some 25 million Americans will suffer from peptic ulcers at some point in their life and there are approximately 1 million ulcer related hospitalizations in the U.S. each year. Prevalence of infection in developing countries increases dramatically. The majority of adults (80-90percent) and 10 percent of children are affected. In addition to ulcers, H. pylori infection has been linked to gastric adenocarcinomas (stomach cancer), non-ulcer dyspepsia (acid reflux disease) and gastritis (inflammation of the stomach).

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Reference:
(n1) Burger, O., Weiss, E., Sharon, N., Tabak, M., Neeman, I. and Ofek, I. "Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori adhesion to human gastric mucus by a high-molecular-weight constituent of cranberry juice." Critical Reviews in Food Science & Nutrition (2002). 42(Suppl.).

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